Review The New Mine on Folking..

The New Mine is the second wonderful blast from the re-constituted Matthews Southern Comfort.

A little history: I had lost track of Iain Matthews. But Like A Radio was a seismic surprise. And this new The New Mine is a very welcome and melodic aftershock. Both albums groove with carefully arranged and then re-arranged ‘Throwaway Street Puzzle’ pieces of rock, folk, pop, and (a touch of) jazz.

The New Mine begins with a brilliant rendition of Joni Mitchell’s brilliant song, ‘Ethiopia’. The tune oozes concern for humanity. Of course, Matthews Southern Comfort’s first big single years ago was a take on Mitchell’s ‘Woodstock’, and the two songs compress the years into very simple plea for a more intelligent, melodic, and vital world. Iain’s voice sings with a deeper pathos than his 70’s recordings, and even touches the raw passion of Bruce Cockburn.

‘The Hands Of Time’ ups the gospel ante and conjures joyous comfort, while confronting a time “when the sleep won’t come”. This song dips into the same spring water as The Band, spring water that flows with a pure and sepia melody.

Now, Robert Palmer had a big hit song with ‘Simply Irresistible’. I think he was singing about a woman. But the same could be said of ‘Feed It’. The tune bulges with a quick melody, a lively lyric, a soulful chorus, and an (almost) 50’s hamburger joint vocal. The songs buzzes with joy, a fluid acoustic guitar solo, and a jazzy piano. Sometimes, even pop music gets to touch the heavens.

And then the album dives into deeper waters. ‘Patty’s Poetry’ has a very catchy chorus and a friendly electric guitar. The title track is bluesy, acoustic, and piano jazzy with a very modern message that seconds the motion of fellow ex-Fairport Richard Thompson’s song that warns, “We’re all working for the Pharaoh”. Then, ‘Starvation Box’ begins with ‘Battle Of Evermore’ Zep thought, but then dissolves into the tale of a Vietnam vet who “won’t go back”. Of course, they nab the guy! And a nice guitar circles the defiance and deep psychology of the song.

A little more of history: Iain sang Fairport’s ‘Meet On The Ledge’. And that song is tattooed on the soul of any British folk-rock lover. ‘Nuff said! The original Matthews Southern Comfort cut three albums of folk music that gave a big wave to west coast Americana music. Then, there was a series of (blessed) solo records, the first two on the (equally blessed) Vertigo label. He moved to Elektra. These albums were tapestries of self-penned and covered songs that, despite their near-perfect beauty, never really sold many copies. He also played in Plainsong with Andy Roberts on guitar and recorded the very great album In Search Of Amelia Earhart. Then countless labels and countless records, including albums with Elliot Murphy and David Surkamp (of Palov’s Dog fame!) proved that Iain, when singing Richard Thompson’s words, did “really mean it” way back in Fairport history.

And, by the way, fans of (the great) Gene Clark and Mason Proffit (of ‘Two Hangmen’ and ‘Eugene Pratt’ fame) will find lots to love in those early solo records.

And now he has resurrected MSC with new members Bart Jan Baartmans, Bart de Win and Eric De Vries in a band that echoes the great sound of Steely Dan or the pop-rock perfection of China Crisis. This album also cuts similar grooves with Nick Lowe’s all over the place Jesus Of Cool (known in America as Pure Pop For Now People). So, this is quite serious rock, folk, pop, and (sort of) jazz stuff.

But, as I often quote Procol Harum, “Still there’ll be more”. ‘C’mon Amigo’ is country acoustic music that hovers in harmonious west coast folk rock beauty, with banjo and accordion breaths. ’The Hole’ slows time and asks the necessary questions about the future of all we hold so dear. The chorus, again, is a melodic exclamation sing-a-long pointed truth that overwhelms cynicism and demands an answer. ‘A Secret Is Gone’ is yet another accordion pulsed tune with urgent psychological plot. If this covers some of the same catchy ethos of the before-mentioned Nick Lowe’s Pure Pop For Now People, it also sings to the Pure Pop People who enjoy good and intelligent rock music.

The final three songs stretch the album to its finish line. ‘The Sacrificial Cow’, again, returns to gospel spring waters, with the nice touch of jazz piano. ‘Inbetween’ rolls with New Orleans flavour, and recalls the easy Big Muddy flow of Bobby Charles’ classic 1972 self-titled album. And then ‘In My Next Life’ is acoustic and confessional soft passion that sits well beside Rick Danko’s take on Sam Cooke’s ‘A Change Is Gonna Come’ from The Band’s Moondog Matinee. It’s a really nice final thoughtful groove.

Way back a long time ago, Iain sang his song, ‘Knowing The Game’ on his Journeys From Gospel Oak album that professed, “You may be taken down, you may be written off, it’s knowing how to stay the same, knowing how to play the game”. Sure, the good stuff always “comes around again”, and this is really good stuff, stuff that knows “how to play the game” but it still tent stakes a tough soul “to stay the same”, and then manages, against a lot of odds, to create yet another Iain Matthews album of near-perfect beauty.

Bill Golembeski

MSC Album Release ..

Matthews Southern Comfort will appear at Grenswerk in Venlo for an album release show. The new album ‘The New Mine’ will be available on March 27th. The release show will be on March 26th in Poppodium Grenswerk..

tickets: Grenswerk

New dates in 2020!

With the new album on it’s way (release february 2020 on MIGMusic) here’s a few dates to look forward to…

Jan 2020

23-01 Art Bar, Frankfurt DE
24-01 Musikpark, Homburg DE
25-01 Earth Music Hall, Wetter DE


Short but sweet tour UK

Fri.   26th.  Kirton Lindsay – Town Hall. UK
Sun. 28th. Pontefract – Iain Matthews book launch “Thro’ My Eyes – a memoir”
Mon. 29th. Pontefract, Tap & Barrel. UK
Tue.  30th. Bilston – Robin 2. UK (w/ Magna Carta)

Shows in October.. Austria and UK!

We’ll be back on the road again in October, folks!

Fri.      12th. Thalgau. Austria
Sat.    13th.  Mayrhofen. Austria

Fri.   26th.  Kirton Lindsay – Town Hall. UK
Sun. 28th. Pontefract – Iain Matthews book launch “Thro’ My Eyes – a memoir”
Mon. 29th.tba. UK
Tue.  30th. Bilston – Robin 2. UK (w/ Magna Carta)

Review on All About Jazz.com

Matthews Southern Comfort: Like A Radio

By DOUG COLLETTE

It’s been nearly half a century since the initial Matthews Southern Comfort album, and Like A Radio is the first in nearly a decade, a bonafide testament to the timeless quality of its namesake’s best work (not mention how it predated today’s Americana). Since his days in Fairport Convention, continuing into solo work that carried him to collaborations with Michael Nesmith and more pop-oriented work into the Nineties, Iain, nee Ian, Matthews has charted his own course as an artist, sufficiently self-motivated to know when pursue his own independent course, yet equally willing and able to collaborate as he does here.

On a dozen artfully-sequenced tracks, multi-instrumentalist Bart Jan Baartmans, keyboardist Bart de Win and singer/songwriter Eric Devries coalesce with the leader to replicate the sound of the original band, encapsulated by their famed rendition of Joni Mitchell’s 1970 tuned, “Woodstock.” This stylistic resemblance further reaffirmed with three additional remakes from earlier MSC releases (including James Taylor’s “Something in the Way She Moves”) on an expanded CD that runs over sixty-minutes , this folk-rooted, vocal harmony-laden approach is a far cry from the jazz-oriented, often baroque leanings of Matthews’ most recent solo endeavors.

The photo of the group’s musical instruments on the front cover of this LP may signal the irony of its title, yet in keeping with Iain’s down-to-earth demeanor, it is far more apropos of the natural affinity for each other these four core musicians display in writing, singing and playing here. Produced by Baartmans, this album is no exercise in nostalgia, as evinced by the way Matthews and company touch upon aspects of modern global culture on “The Thought Police:” they couch this topicality in a sparkling but soft mix of delicate singing and the twinkling of acoustic guitars that offer the barest hint of country music.

The glowing electric piano very effectively contrasts those textures, an effect continued in the sly titlesong; here is where it becomes apparent Like A Radio is an album in which to become deeply immersed for the sound quality alone, despite the fact there are no solos much longer than the acoustic piano there. Matthews Southern Comfort circa 2018 takes a nuanced, insinuating approach, and the bandleader’s own voice is fundamental to that inviting air, even when the material at hand is as potentially off-putting as “The Age of Isolation.”

Yet the dispassionate thinking at the root of that song, like the bulk of this collaboratively-composed material, signals the maturity of a group convinced that the passage of time has its advantages. As captured on this recording, the sound a is naturally warm, at once spare and lush (somehow) and those virtues, for some listeners, may camouflage an unflagging certainty of purpose evident within originals such as “Bits and Pieces.” Precious little here offers direct obeisance to roots as does the semi-reel “Crystals On the Glass,” but here as elsewhere, the comparative brevity of the track works in its favor.

And the wry sense of humor Matthews Southern Comfort displays during “Jive Pajamas” reaffirms the wisdom of this grouping, not mention its timely release. Over the course of time, Like A Radio should demonstrate a durability comparable to its predecessors (and so many of Mathew’s other work). But early listens to the record illuminate how gracefully its leader has aged; no longer the waif with the boyish countenance, there remains a dignity in Iain Matthews’ greying visage corresponding to the burnished instrumental and vocal strains that populate this record and render it so affecting.


Track Listing: The Thought Police; Like A Radio; The Age Of Isolation; Bits And Pieces; Darcy Farrow; Crystals On The Glass; Been Down So Long; Jive Pajamas; Phoenix Rising; To Love; Right As Rain; Chasing Rainbows; Bonus tracks: Something In The Way She Moves; A Heartless Night; Your Cake And Eat It.

Personnel: Iain Matthews: vocals, guitar; Bart Jan Baartmans: vocals, guitar, bass, drums: Bart de Win: vocals, keyboards; Eric De Vries: vocals, guitar, mandolin.

Title: Like A Radio | Year Released: 2018 | Record Label: Made In Germany Records

Review! Pete Sargeant wrote @ Just listen to this..

Out of the blue and with a band of Dutch musicians whose grip on this artist’s feel for roots and folk music and vintage and modern Americana is eminently displayed here…a new album from Iain Matthews and the new Matthews Southern Comfort!
Fifteen new recordings, sounding fresh and well-realised. The group members are Bart Jan Baartmans on various guitars and related, keyboard man Bart De Win and Eric de Vries on acoustic guitar and singing. On the sleeve their portraits suggest they could play an artful pack of Amsterdam jewel thieves film if this doesn’t work out..just kidding, gentlemen…there’s a real folk craftsmen look about them. read more here.. Just Listen to this